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Have economic and social effects on local communities changed?

Indicators: Revenues and Landings by State and Port Group

Key Findings

In the three years immediately prior to the Northeast Multispecies Sector Program, total gross groundfish revenues (adjusted to 2013 constant dollars) decreased from 2007 through 2009. The decline continued into the first year of the Sector Program (2010) before rebounding in 2011 and then dropping sharply in 2012 and 2013. For the Northeast Multispecies Sector Program as a whole, total gross revenues fell 40 percent from 2007 to 2013. At the state level, all states experienced declines from 2009 to 2013. At the port level, trends are similar whether the revenues are analyzed by home port or port of landing. These recent declines are part of a larger declining trend in gross revenues seen in the data stretching back to the early 1980s.

The interactive charts below offer multiple outputs and views to portray these data graphically. Use the tabs at the top of the graphic element to see different views. Data for individual states, communities, years, and species can be isolated by filtering the interactive charts.

Interactive Charts

Metrics

This indicator shows changes in groundfish landings at the level of communities, as a component of effects on the economic and social life of communities.

Analysis

Baseline: Before Catch Share Program

From 2007 through 2009, total gross revenues from groundfish landings by fishing year decreased from approximately $97.5 million (in $2013) to approximately $88.4 million.

By Home Port State

Vessels with home ports in Massachusetts had the highest total gross revenues during the project baseline. Their revenues totaled nearly $63.4 million in 2007, increased to nearly $64.1 million in 2008, and decreased slightly to $63.0 million in 2009. Vessels with home ports in Maine had the next highest gross revenues with totals near $15 million to $16 million for all three baseline years in the dataset. Vessels based in New Hampshire had total annual revenues of approximately $5 million to $8 million, and vessels from home ports in Rhode Island brought in $3 million to $8 million per year. States in the southern range of the fishery showed lower total gross revenues (Vessel Activity by State and Port Group).

By Home Port

Home ports with the highest gross revenues during baseline years were all in Massachusetts: New Bedford, Gloucester, and Boston. Totals in New Bedford and Boston slightly increased in 2008, followed by a subsequent decrease in 2009. Gross revenues in Gloucester, however, were higher in 2009 than in 2007, as they were in Portland, Maine. Gross revenues in other Massachusetts home ports increased, on the whole, from 2007 to 2009, while gross revenues in other Maine home ports decreased.

By Port of Landing State

In addition to home port, we analyzed revenues by port of landing because vessels can land fish in ports other than their home ports. The ports with the most landings are not always those with most home-port vessels. Rather, vessels travel from various home ports to land fish in the same port, creating a center of regional interaction; these ports of landing can also vary throughout the year depending on the location of productive fishing grounds. By port of landing, Massachusetts had the highest total gross revenues for the baseline years, ranging from $73.7 million in 2007 to $75.5 million in 2009 (2.4 percent increase). Maine had the next highest totals during the three-year period, but it declined 45 percent from 2007 to 2009. Other states had very small gross revenue totals by port of landing, with all revenue figures at or below approximately $6 million for any one year. While steady declines occurred in most of the states from 2007 to 2009, three states–Massachusetts, Maine, and New Hampshire–had some years with increases. Trends by port of landing generally paralleled the trends by home port state (see above), although the revenues per port differed between the two analyses.

By Port of Landing

New Bedford and Gloucester were the ports of landing with the highest gross revenues. Their revenues were approximately $17 million to $19 million higher than the next highest port of landing. However, New Bedford experienced an overall decline in gross revenue, while Gloucester experienced an overall increase. Gross revenues for Boston remained relatively constant from 2007 through 2009. Revenues in Portland, Maine, dropped by half over that time period, despite reaching nearly $11 million in 2008. Other ports of landing generally had gross revenues of $6 million or less during project baseline years.

OST Data

Two of the interactive charts above present data on revenues by state from 1980 to 2013 for a range of groundfish species based on data from the NOAA Office of Science and Technology (OST). The OST datasets are tabulated differently than the datasets used by NOAA Fisheries in annual regional performance reports, and the OST data include some groundfish species that are not managed as part of the multispecies groundfish fishery. The OST data show longer-term trends in the fishery. The OST data show that from 1983 to the year prior to the Sector Program (2009), revenues declined approximately 70 percent from nearly $300 million to less than $100 million, with the largest decreases in Massachusetts and Maine.

During Catch Share Program 

Total gross revenues for all states combined were lower in the first year of the Sector Program (2010) than they had been in 2009. In 2011, revenues increased to over $93 million, but this total was still lower than the revenues for 2007 and 2008. Gross revenue totals fell nearly 24 percent from 2011 to 2012, and they dropped another 18.6 percent in 2013. These trends in revenue do not clearly match changes in annual catch limits (ACLs) in the fishery (Northeast Groundfish Fishery ACLs), suggesting a more complex relationship between ACLs, landings volumes, market forces and gross revenues.

By Home Port State

Gross revenues by home port remained relatively constant from 2010 to 2013 for all states other than Massachusetts and Maine, which experienced clear declines. Massachusetts experienced the largest loss between 2009 and 2013, dropping from nearly $63 million to about $39 million in gross revenue.

By Home Port

The increase in gross revenues by home port observed in Massachusetts in 2011 can be attributed largely to localized increases in New Bedford and Boston, and to relatively steady (and already high) gross revenues in Gloucester. In 2012 and 2013, however, declines are evident for all home ports in the state. In New Bedford, gross revenues were approximately $19.5 million in 2010 and then after increasing in 2011 fell by over 38 percent to $13.4 million in 2013. In Boston, gross revenues were approximately $15 million in 2010, increased to nearly $18 million in 2011, and then decreased by over 37 percent to $11.2 million in 2013. Despite increased revenues in some years for certain ports following implementation of the Northeast Multispecies Sector Program, by 2013 almost all communities had an overall decline in gross revenues compared to 2009. Portland was one of the few home ports that experienced an increase in gross revenues between 2012 and 2013.

By Port of Landing State and Port of Landing

The same trends were observed for gross revenues by port of landing state. Revenues dropped in 2010 before rebounding in 2011 and then steeply declining in 2012 and 2013. Across the northeastern states, only Massachusetts had a relatively steady increase in gross revenues through 2011. In 2012 and 2013, however, gross revenues in Massachusetts dropped by 41.7 percent, from a high of $80.7 million in 2011 to a low of $47 million in 2013.

The data show that vessels from home port states throughout New England participated in the Northeast Multispecies Sector Program; however, the landings of those vessels were concentrated largely in Massachusetts, including the ports of Gloucester, Boston, and New Bedford.

Data Gaps and Limitations

In general, detailed information has not been collected consistently at the port/port group level for the entirety of the project baseline of 2002 to 2009. The baseline period presented here (2007-2009) is shorter than the timeframe presented for other indicators because data prior to 2007 are not comparable to data gathered during the catch share program.

We report revenues in real values adjusted to $2013. In some of its performance reports for the Northeast region, NOAA Fisheries provides economic results in nominal values, although their 2013 report adjusts annual values to $2010 constant dollars. Our approach for adjusting these disparate values into $2013 is explained in our downloadable Economic Methods document.

The dataset contains limited information on home ports and ports of landing. It provides information only for the ports most heavily involved in the multispecies groundfish fishery. For confidentiality reasons, data for ports with small numbers of active vessels are aggregated by NOAA, masking potential trends at the individual port level for much of the Northeast.

Information Sources

Kitts, A., et al. 2011. 2010 Final Report on the Performance of the Northeast Multispecies (Groundfish) Fishery (May 2010-April 2011), 2nd Edition. National Marine Fisheries Service, NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center Reference Document 11-19. Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Available online: www.nefsc.noaa.gov/read/socialsci/pdf/groundfish_report.pdf

Murphy, T., et al. 2012. 2011 Final Report on the Performance of the Northeast Multispecies (Groundfish) Fishery (May 2011-April 2012). National Marine Fisheries Service, NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center Reference Document 12-30. Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Available online: www.nefsc.noaa.gov/nefsc/publications/crd/crd1230/crd1230.pdf

Murphy, T., et al. 2013. 2012 Final Report on the Performance of the Northeast Multispecies (Groundfish) Fishery (May 2012-April 2013). National Marine Fisheries Service, NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center Reference Document 14-01. Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Available online: www.nefsc.noaa.gov/publications/crd/crd1401/crd1401.pdf

Murphy, T., et al. 2014. 2013 Final Report on the Performance of the Northeast Multispecies (Groundfish) Fishery (May 2031-April 2014). National Marine Fisheries Service, NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center Reference Document 15-02. Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Available online: www.nefsc.noaa.gov/publications/crd/crd1502/crd1502.pdf

Updated: August 2015

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